Tag Archives: photography

orange oranges

It’s true that I have posted all but one of these photos before, just not all together. Given my recent run on orange photos, I felt compelled to share some of my favorite orange photos.


One of my favorites from my year of Project 365. This was when I was playing around with long exposures and motion blurs.


Having recently shared photos of an orange flower, it brought to mind this photo I took of the very flower-like shape on the stem end of a clementine.


Here’s that same clementine, but without the macro lens.


Also from Project 365, when I played with perspective. I would love to try this one again some time.


My snack scraps, beautifully catching the afternoon light earlier this year.


A more recent macro photo.

6 unrelated photos

Here are 6 photos I took over the past 9 years or so, on various travels to other countries, as well as to places closer to home.

London, England, 2005


Volklingen, Germany, 2007


Sevilla, Spain, 2009


Massachusetts, United States, 2011


Macao, 2011


Dublin, Ireland, 2014

orange ruffles

These ruffly orange flowers caught my eye over the weekend while at a farm for apple picking.

As best I can tell from a quick googling, they are some sort of marigold. (But if anyone knows more specifically what they are, please share!)

orange glow

A few days ago, while waiting for the school bus, I noticed a cluster of oak leaves being illuminated by the low afternoon sun. I was quite pleased that I was able to capture some of their striking orange glow.

(I couldn’t decide which of these 3 I liked best, so I’m just sharing all 3.)

shadow play

This is a series of photos I took during a visit to the zoo 2 years ago. The late afternoon sun was creating remarkably sharp shadows on this boulder, perfectly projecting the shadows of the kids and their friends as they playfully threw leaves at each other.

wet windshield impressionism

In a variation of my recurring theme of fall leaves in the rain I offer you photos of fall leaves taken through the rain. In this case, through a rainy windshield. We went apple picking today, and while it mostly did not rain, there were a few minutes at the end when the rain came down in bucketloads.

Happily for me, the rain happpened to fall most heavily while I was sitting parked in my car, facing some beautiful fall foliage. I always enjoy looking at the patterns formed by rain on the glass, and the view of the pretty fall colors did not disappoint.

In fact, the distortion of the view made the trees look like they were painted in thick, blobby brushstrokes, reminding me of an impressionist painting. But much wetter.

to catch a snowflake (friday foto finder: snowflake)

We interrupt our regularly scheduled programing of fall leaves and water drops to bring you a preview of the trends to come.

Back in January, a few weeks after I serendipitously spotted and photographed a bunch of freshly fallen and perfectly articulated snowflakes, I decided to try to try my luck with intentionally capturing freshly fallen snowflakes. Once there is snow on the ground (which there pretty much is here December through February or March), the fresh flakes tend to blend in with the old flakes. They are certainly fresher and whiter than the snow on the ground, but they don’t photograph well. What they need is a bit more contrast to show off their lines.

So, when snowstorm started, I decided to see if I could catch some snowflakes. As a background, I grabbed a dark colored fuzzy scarf and brought it outside to my front yard. Actually, first I let it chill for a bit on covered front porch, because a warm scarf from inside would certainly melt any individual snowflakes pretty much instantly.

The trap was moderately successful, and I could indeed make out the shapes of many an individual snowflake. Photographing them was rather challenging, though. You see, snowflakes are small. It’s quite tricky to focus on the little buggers. And you might also be surprised to know that when it is snowing outside, it can be downright cold out. Yes, you heard it here first. The result of this was that as I squatted over my scarf trying to focus on the individual flakes with my quickly numbing fingers, I also got downright chilled. (Shivering, does not help one steady one’s hand.)

Clearly, what I needed was to bring out a tripod. However, it wasn’t long before it was a moot point. The fickle New England weather turned from snow to freezing rain, and the individual snowflakes on my scarf quickly evolved into clumps of slush.

Perhaps this year I will try again and set an all-new snowflake trap, and work out these kinks. Build a better snowflake trap, as it were.

This week’s friday foto finder theme was “snowflake.” To see the flurry of other snowflakes that have been caught, stop by the fff blog.