Category Archives: photography

5 arched gates

Here are 5 photos of arched gates that I have come across over recent years.

Malahide, Ireland, 2014


Sevilla, Spain, 2009


New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, 2005


Portland, Oregon, USA, 2012


Shanghai, China, 2012

This is another unintentional series of photos. Had I had the series in mind, I likely would have framed gates more similarly. (Also, I do wish I could go back in time and replace the point-and-shoot camera I was using in 2005 on my trip to New Orleans. I suppose it would also be worthwhile just to go back to New Orleans…)

gate of chains (friday foto finder: links)

This gate caught my eye on my visit to the Park Güell in Barcelona, Spain back in 2009. Neither a chained gate nor a gate of chain link fencing this particular gate was itself made of made of heavy iron chain links.

I also find it cool to see how different the same gate looked from different angles, with different lighting conditions. These next 2 images were from a photo with the bright light shining on the gate, whereas the others show the same gate silhouetted.

This week’s friday foto finder theme was “links.” I have shared quite a few links before (both the chained gates and chainlink fences mentioned, and linked to, earlier.) But I don’t believe I’ve shared these particular links before. To see what other kinds of links have been sighted, follow the link to the fff blog!

orange oranges

It’s true that I have posted all but one of these photos before, just not all together. Given my recent run on orange photos, I felt compelled to share some of my favorite orange photos.


One of my favorites from my year of Project 365. This was when I was playing around with long exposures and motion blurs.


Having recently shared photos of an orange flower, it brought to mind this photo I took of the very flower-like shape on the stem end of a clementine.


Here’s that same clementine, but without the macro lens.


Also from Project 365, when I played with perspective. I would love to try this one again some time.


My snack scraps, beautifully catching the afternoon light earlier this year.


A more recent macro photo.

orange glow

A few days ago, while waiting for the school bus, I noticed a cluster of oak leaves being illuminated by the low afternoon sun. I was quite pleased that I was able to capture some of their striking orange glow.

(I couldn’t decide which of these 3 I liked best, so I’m just sharing all 3.)

to catch a snowflake (friday foto finder: snowflake)

We interrupt our regularly scheduled programing of fall leaves and water drops to bring you a preview of the trends to come.

Back in January, a few weeks after I serendipitously spotted and photographed a bunch of freshly fallen and perfectly articulated snowflakes, I decided to try to try my luck with intentionally capturing freshly fallen snowflakes. Once there is snow on the ground (which there pretty much is here December through February or March), the fresh flakes tend to blend in with the old flakes. They are certainly fresher and whiter than the snow on the ground, but they don’t photograph well. What they need is a bit more contrast to show off their lines.

So, when snowstorm started, I decided to see if I could catch some snowflakes. As a background, I grabbed a dark colored fuzzy scarf and brought it outside to my front yard. Actually, first I let it chill for a bit on covered front porch, because a warm scarf from inside would certainly melt any individual snowflakes pretty much instantly.

The trap was moderately successful, and I could indeed make out the shapes of many an individual snowflake. Photographing them was rather challenging, though. You see, snowflakes are small. It’s quite tricky to focus on the little buggers. And you might also be surprised to know that when it is snowing outside, it can be downright cold out. Yes, you heard it here first. The result of this was that as I squatted over my scarf trying to focus on the individual flakes with my quickly numbing fingers, I also got downright chilled. (Shivering, does not help one steady one’s hand.)

Clearly, what I needed was to bring out a tripod. However, it wasn’t long before it was a moot point. The fickle New England weather turned from snow to freezing rain, and the individual snowflakes on my scarf quickly evolved into clumps of slush.

Perhaps this year I will try again and set an all-new snowflake trap, and work out these kinks. Build a better snowflake trap, as it were.

This week’s friday foto finder theme was “snowflake.” To see the flurry of other snowflakes that have been caught, stop by the fff blog.

balloon ride in the rain

As I mentioned yesterday, I’ve never actually been on a hot air balloon, though I really hope to some day.¹ I have, however, been on an amusement park ride with cars shaped like hot air balloons.²

These photos are from my family’s 2010 trip to Story Land in New Hampshire. It was rainy the afternoon we arrived, but there was still fun to be had, and photos to be taken.

This trip was during my participation in Project 365 for which I committed to taking (at least) a photo a day to share online. I further decided to have monthly themes. This was still in my first month of the project, for which I chose reflections for my theme.

Amusement parks provide lots of shiny surfaces, so it was a good place to find reflections. I wasn’t actually too sorry that there was rain that day!

¹ I came really close to going on one when I was 13, but the weather conditions were wrong the day I was scheduled to go. Here we are 30 years later, and I still haven’t managed to reschedule…

² You might recognize these balloons from the set of amusement park ride silhouettes I posted a few weeks ago. ³

³ And once more, I am enjoying running with a theme. Or perhaps getting carried away with a theme, in this case. This past Friday’s friday foto finder theme was balloons and I found I couldn’t stop with just one. (Or even with the 3 I posted on Friday.)

more abstract compositions found on a rusty dumpster

I imagine that many people don’t much notice the nitty-gritty details of places they frequent. I probably don’t much notice many of them myself. But I do have to say that I was rather amused to have noticed that a dumpster that sits next to a parking lot I frequent was swapped out for another dumpster. You see, I had previously admired the patterns made by the rust breaking through the bright blue paint on this particular dumpster. One pattern on the side reminded me of enameled jewelry. (Over a year ago, I posted a collection of photos I had accumulated of details of the patterns made by rust and weathered paint on the sides of dumpsters. The dumpster in question is featured in the top photo of that post.)

Upon realizing that there was a new (at least, new to the location, but certainly not newly fabricated) dumpster, I was happy to observe that the new arrival had its own pretty patterns of rust and striking abstract compositions.


The shapes of this bit remind me of a map, and the colors of earthenware pottery glazes.


The layers of various bright colors remind me again of enamelwork.


And this was just a pleasing abstract composition featuring the letter V. (Or maybe it’s a Y. I think it’s open to interpretation.)